The Rudner’s: Joseph and Florence’s family

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My great-great-great-grandfather Yehuda Alte Dov and his wife Beilah had four sons (that we know of): Yakov, Tobias, Wolfe, and Lieb Leon.
This section focuses on the offspring of Yakov/Yankov as he was known in Yiddish– or Jacob, as he was referred by his children as they settled in Montreal. This article looks at the descendants of his son Joseph, as well as his children and grandchildren. To see the main article on Rudners, which links to Joseph’s siblings, and as well as to Tobias’ descendants, click here.

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The Rudners: Eva and Pearl

My great-great-great-grandfather Yehuda Alte Dov and his wife Beilah had four sons that we know of: Yakov, Tobias, Wolfe, and Lieb Leon.
This section focuses on the offspring of Yakov (Yankov, as he was known in Yiddish) — or Jacob, as he was referred by his children after they settled in Montreal. This article looks at the descendants of Yakov’s two daughters, Eva and Pearl, as well as their children and grandchildren. As Eva became a Siminovitch and Pearl became a Stern, their descendants are no longer Rudners; for that reason, they do not each get their own page, nor as much detail. But, their children are cousins of Rudners, and their grandchildren are second cousins, and thus merit mention. To see the main article on Rudners, which links to Eva’s and Pearl’s brothers, and as well as to Tobias’ descendants, click here.
There was an interesting difference between Lea’s family and Pearl’s, and their brothers’. Abraham’s, Israel’s and Lea’s children associated with each other– they went to the same Hebrew schools, dances, teas, card game evenings, weddings, and some even vacationed together. Whereas Pearl’s family interacted somewhat with the Siminovitches, but not with the Rudner’s. That may explain why Moe Rudner’s tree had no information about the Sterns.

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The Rudners: Israel’s children

My great-great-great-grandfather Yehuda Alte Dov and his wife Beilah had four sons (that we know of): Yakov, Tobias, Wolfe, and Lieb Leon.
This section focuses on the offspring of Yakov/Yankov as he was known in Yiddish– or Jacob, as he was referred by his children as they settled in Montreal. This article looks at the descendents of the man known as Sruhl or Shrul in the family, and Israel and Isidore in public records, as well as his children and grandchildren.

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The Rudners

The nice thing about researching the Rudner side of my family is that the name “Rudner” is distinctive, and thus easy to find. Family lore has it that all Rudners are related, and all other Rudners I’ve come across (a listserv run by a man in Texas in the mid-1990s, a Facebook group c2010, etc) were told the same thing. The origin of the name could be German (something to do with sheep) or a modification of the Russian “Rudnev”. What’s interesting about the online research is that it is quite clear that while there are variations and similar names (e.g. “Rudnitsky”), the name “Rudner” is clearly a family name across time and countries, and not an accident in one particular branch. The family name was quite clearly Rudner, and those Rudners left Romania/Russia/Austria and settled elsewhere.
The question is: who were they? Where did they originally come from? Were the emigrants all siblings, and the Rudners of the world are their descendants? Or were the emigrants siblings, cousins, extended family, and thus us Rudners have a broader source that needs to go back further generations to find a common ancestor?

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The Rudners: Abraham’s children

My great-great-great-grandfather Yehuda Alte Dov and his wife Beilah had four sons (that we know of): Yakov, Tobias, Wolfe, and Lieb Leon.
This section focuses on the offspring of Yakov/Yankov as he was known in Yiddish– or Jacob, as he was referred by his children as they settled in Montreal. This article looks at Abraham and his children and grandchildren.

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Montreal’s Plateau district

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The Plateau district, to the east and south-east of the mountain, was the immigrant section for Montreal in the pre-WWII time period. Thousands of poor Jews (the immigrant wave at that time) lived in those blocks– you didn’t even need to know any English or French, as the language of the area was Yiddish! They lived in small apartments (if they were lucky), or tenements or as boarders (if they were less fortunate). They worked for employers who were willing to hire Jews– the many clothing factories (in the “shmatte [rag] trade”), small shops, or other operations. Their children went to the Protestant schools that would take them (the Board created the Baron Byng high school to segregate the Jews from the Protestant children), and to the handful of Jewish schools operating in duplexes or storefronts. They went to religious services in the dozen small synagogues– again, many of them were in apartments or storefronts, although a few grew to be their own building.

If you have ancestors who lived in this neighbourhood, you can find where they lived through census data (the 1911 and 1921 censuses are available online, free) or through Lovell’s, which was Montreal’s city directory. [Note that it’s household heads who were listed, sometimes with boarders, and it was optional; sometimes other significant wage earners were included].

But then you’ll run in a problem: Montreal’s street numbers changed in the 1920s! Not only north-south streets, but also east-west streets changed when Montreal switched to the grid-numbering system. So, where was your great-grandfather’s house? Continue reading